JUST IN: LOUIS RAEMAEKERS PRINT OF HIS WORLD WAR I ANTI-GERMAN PROPAGANDA CARTOON “BEARDED GERMAN SEA VULTURE (BIRD OF PREY)

Louis Raemaekers (1869 – 1956) was a Dutch painter and editorial cartoonist for the Amsterdam newspaper De Telegraaf during World War I, noted for his anti-German stance. “Immediately after the Germans invaded Belgium, Louis Raemaekers became one of their fiercest critics.” He believed that the Netherlands had to take sides for the Allies and abandon its neutral stance.

Raemaekers graphic cartoons depicted the rule of the German military in Belgium, portraying the Germans as barbarians and Kaiser Wilhelm II as an ally of Satan. He decided to settle in England in November 1915 and his family followed in early 1916.”

The most important aspect of Raemaekers’ career wass undoubtedly his role in making Allied war propaganda. Soon after his arrival in London he was contacted by Britain's War Propaganda Bureau, Wellington House, to ensure the mass distribution of his work both in England and elsewhere in support of the Allied cause. Forty of his most popular cartoons were published in “Raemaekers Cartoons,” which was immediately translated in eighteen languages and distributed worldwide in neutral countries.

Louis Raemaekers print of his World War I anti-German propaganda cartoon “Bearded German Sea Vulture (bird of prey). Price: $250